Posts with tag debt

Repeal the Debt Ceiling?

Alfred Adask, September 16 2017

...if the day ever comes when government can't even repay the interest on the National Debt, the illusion of solvency will disappear and the economy will collapse into calamity.

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New York City’s Spending Problem

Guest Writer, September 9 2020

Indeed, the burden of government spending has climbed more than three times faster than inflation during De Blasio’s time in office. If this story sounds familiar, that’s because excessive spending is the cause of every fiscal crisis.

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WHO BENEFITED FROM STIMULUS 1.0? - Largely Households Making Under $100,000

Guest Writer, February 3 2021

As Congress nears debate on another round of stimulus/relief aid for American households, businesses, state and local governments, schools, Covid vaccination delivery, and more, I thought it would be instructive to see how the direct aid sent as part of Stimulus 1.0 was spent.

A new report from the IRS shows that the first round of economic impact payments (or stimulus checks) primarily benefited households earning less than $100,000. 

This is good news.

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HOW WILL SKYROCKETING DEBT AFFECT COMPANIES’ FUTURES? - Only the Zombies Know for Sure

Guest Writer, May 1 2021

Less Americans getting infected, more Americans getting vaccinated, $6 trillion in government spending, with at least $4 trillion more on the table, and many trillions more from an anything-goes Fed.

What do they have in common? They’re all converging to create what giddy economists and others, like Axios’ Nicholas Johnston, say will be “a year of U.S. economic growth for the record books.” 

With those kind of numbers (think 10 zeros!), it better be record-setting!

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SOARING OIL & GAS PRICES PRESSURING INFLATION EVEN MORE

Guest Writer, March 9 2022

Prices at the gas pump are soaring toward an all-time high, but drivers appear to be saying, oh well—for now anyway.

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CONSUMER DEBT SURGES $41.8 BILLION And That’s Before Worst of Gas Spike

Guest Writer, April 9 2022

Americans’ credit cards got a sweaty workout in February, as monthly consumer debt rose the highest in over a decade.

Matt Phillips believes it could mean that climbing inflation coupled with households’ diminished savings are forcing more people to use plastic.

The Fed's monthly consumer credit report for February came out yesterday, showing that consumer debt — excluding mortgage debt — jumped by $41.8 billion, or 11.3%.

Revolving credit — typically credit cards — rose by a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 21%, up from 4% the prior month. Nonrevolving credit, which includes auto and student loans, was up 8.4%.

With pandemic stimulus payments now a fading memory — and families’ record savings cushion a thing of the past — it seems a no-brainer that out of control inflation has us back to running up our personal debt.

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Distressed Debt Jumps 300% in 2022

Guest Writer, January 4 2023

Sorry for the cliché, but the more things change, the more they remain the same. 

Nowhere is this more painfully obvious than in the financial industry – where cracks are expanding in already porous credit dykes all over the world.

You think we'd have learned from the disastrous effects of the Great Recession 15 years ago.

But after additional years of excess from banks stuck with piles of buyout debt, a pension blow-up in the UK and real-estate troubles in China, South Korea and more recently the U.S., we’re finding again that what’s past is prologue.

Thanks to global central bank rate hiking, cheap money is quickly becoming a thing of the past. 

Distressed debt in the U.S. alone jumped more than 300% in 12 months, according to Bloomberg News.

Plus, high-yield issuance is much more challenging in places like Europe, and leverage ratios have reached record levels.

The aggressive rate hikes have dramatically changed the landscape for lending – stressing credit markets and pushing economies toward recessions, a scenario that markets have yet to price in.

Nearly $650 billion of bonds and loans are distressed, according to Bloomberg. 

It’s all adding up to the biggest test of the stress tolerance of corporate credit since the 2008 financial crisis and may be the spark for a wave of coming defaults.

Will Nicoll, chief investment officer at M&G, said, “It is very difficult to see how the default cycle will not run its course, given the level of interest rates.”

Banks say their wider credit models are proving robust so far, but they’ve begun setting aside more money for missed payments.

Loan-loss provisions at systematically important banks surged 75% in the 3rd quarter compared to 2021 – a clear indication they’re preparing for payment issues and defaults.

Most economists see at least a moderate GDP slump over the coming year. 

Some, like Paul Singer of Elliott Management, however, fear a deep recession could cause significant credit issues because the global financial system is “vastly over-leveraged.” 

Citigroup economists believe rolling recessions are likely across the globe next year, with the U.S. likely to slip into one by the middle of next year.

Mike Scott at Man GLG warned that “markets seem to be expecting a soft landing in the U.S. that may not happen.”

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7 posts with tag debt online